July 1 commemorates the joining of Canada’s original three provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the Canada province, which is now Ontario and Quebec) as one nation in 1867. On July 1, 1867, Canada became a self-governing dominion of Great Britain and a federation of provinces. The anniversary of this date was called Dominion Day (for the Dominion of Canada in the British empire) until 1982. Since 1983, July 1 has been officially known as Canada Day.

 

Since 1958, the government has arranged for an annual celebration of Canada’s Birthday where originally the Canadian Secretary of State was in charge of the Co-ordination of events. The format of trooping of the colours on the lawn at Parliament Hill, a sunset ceremony, and live band with fireworks was the main order of the day. However since 1980 seed money has been distributed by the government of Canada and now popular and amateur activities are organised in hundreds of communities by volunteer groups to mark the day. The sovereign Queen Elizabeth 2nd has attended many times including the Canada Day centennial.

 

Typically, Canada Day is celebrated with fireworks, concerts, cookouts, and sports games. Canada’s capital, Ottawa, Ontario, hosts tens of thousands, and countless events and festivals to be found throughout the city in the city streets, parks, and museums. Fireworks are launched from Parliament Hill to conclude a day of patriotic festivities. Today, amid COVID-19 restrictions, No live fireworks, no star-studded concert on Parliament Hill, and no crowds of tourists: Canada’s official birthday celebrations on this year for the first time ever will be completely online. Although things are different, you can still show off your national pride on this 153rd birthday!

 

Stand Proud. Stay United. Be Safe.