Global Handwashing Day

Global Handwashing Day

Global Handwashing Day

 

Global Handwashing Day is an annual global advocacy day dedicated to advocacting for handwashing with soap as an easy, effective, and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives. “Hand Hygiene for All” is the theme of this year’s Global Handwashing Day, following a recent World Health Organization initiative calling for improved hand hygiene. Global Handwashing Day was established by the Global Handwashing Partnership.

 

The first Global Handwashing Day was held in 2008, when over 120 million children around the world washed their hands with soap in more than 70 countries. Everyone can protect themselves, their families, and their communities through handwashing with soap. Though it requires few resources—soap and a small amount of water—the benefits are significant. Handwashing with soap helps prevent the spread of infections including influenza and Ebola.

 

Keeping our hands clean is one of the simplest and most important habits we can adopt to prevent contracting Covid-19 and spreading the coronavirus that causes the disease to others. Without washing properly and killing off the coronavirus — and other viruses, bacteria and germs we pick up from raw meats, fecal matter and respiratory droplets — it can spread between people and cause disease.

 

Be grateful you can wash your hands.

 

There are 818 million children who don’t have access to basic handwashing with water and soap at school. At least 3 billion people, or 40% of the world’s population, do not have a handwashing facility with soap and water at home.

 

 

Handwashing with soap is an easy, effective, affordable do-it-yourself practice that prevents infections and saves lives.

 

Just Do It!…please

 

How Germs Spread

Washing hands can keep you healthy and prevent the spread of respiratory and diarrheal infections from one person to the next. Germs can spread from other people or surfaces when you:

  • Touch your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Prepare or eat food and drinks with unwashed hands
  • Touch a contaminated surface or objects
  • Blow your nose, cough, or sneeze into hands and then touch other people’s hands or common objects

Key Times to Wash Hands

You can help yourself and your loved ones stay healthy by washing your hands often, especially during these key times when you are likely to get and spread germs:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage

 

Follow Five Steps to Wash Your Hands the Right Way

Washing your hands is easy, and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of germs. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community—from your home and workplace to childcare facilities and hospitals.

Follow these five steps every time.

 

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

 

Worried about dry hands? After washing your hands, simply pat them dry with a clean towel but leave them slightly damp “to lock in the moisture” from ointments and creams that you’ll work into your skin, fingertips and nails.

 

Happy Thanksgiving 2020!

Happy Thanksgiving 2020!

happy_thanksgiving_canada

 

On Thanksgiving, Canadians give thanks for a successful year and harvest. The Thanksgiving holiday tradition in Canada dates back to when the English explorer, Martin Frobisher, came upon the land we now know as Canada while searching for a Northern passage to the Orient. When Frobisher arrived in Canada on his third voyage in 1578, he held a formal ceremony where he gave thanks for surviving the long journey – one of his ships had been lost on the way. South of the border, it would be another 43 years before the Pilgrims sat down to celebrate their first Thanksgiving meal. Happy Thanksgiving 2020!

 

Thanksgiving became a nationally recognised holiday in Canada in 1879. The date of the holiday has moved around a few times since then, and settled on the current date in 1957. Apart from taking place years before its American counterpart, Canadian thanksgiving also takes place over a month earlier. One reason is that the harvest season starts earlier in the more northerly Canada than it does in the US.

 

Today, it is celebrated by gathering with loved ones and preparing the Thanksgiving Day meal, which usually includes turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and many other dishes. There are often regional variations on the meal.

 

In the regions where Canadian Thanksgiving is celebrated, most government offices will be closed and so will many local amenities. Public transport is likely to run on a holiday or Sunday schedule. Banks will be closed along with the Toronto Stock Exchange.

 

What are you thankful for this year? Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

 

 

National Seniors Day 2020

National Seniors Day 2020

National Seniors Day Canada

 

October 1 of each year is National Seniors Day, which coincides with the United Nations International Day of Older Persons and is an occasion for Canadians to celebrate the profound contributions of seniors in our homes, communities and workplaces. For all they have achieved throughout life and for all they continue to accomplish, we owe older citizens our thanks and a heartfelt salute. We can best demonstrate our gratitude and esteem by making sure that our communities are good places in which to safely mature and grow older — places in which older people can participate to the fullest and can find the encouragement, acceptance, assistance, and services they need to continue to lead lives of independence and dignity. This year marks the 10th Anniversary of National Seniors Day in Canada and due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, a more solemn milestone as well.

 

Join CARP and special guests for an interactive online event honouring Canada’s seniors and those who have lost their lives to COVID-19 .

 

More than 82% of COVID-19 related deaths are connected to long-term care homes—over 7,500 vulnerable residents have succumbed to the virus to date. More than just a statistic, this number represents real people with names and faces, and with important life stories that must be remembered.

 

With this in mind, CARP is hosting Canada’s largest-ever virtual meeting of seniors to talk about what happened and why, as well as how to protect our vulnerable older people in the coming months. Just as importantly, the event serves to remember those who lost their lives; not as statistics, but as parents, grandparents, teachers, mentors—real people who we failed to protect. A national Minute of Silence will serve as a powerful reminder that one death due to negligence in long-term care is one too many.

 

The free online event, comprising both a national and regional portion which will directly tackle seniors’ issues in your part of Canada, brings together a panel of very special guests to explore critical topics affecting older adults and offers an empowering message of hope on this milestone occasion.

 

Click Here for Event Information: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/carp-national-seniors-day-online-event-tickets-115086631212

 

CARP (Canadian Association for Retired Persons) is Canada’s largest advocacy association for older Canadians. Today CARP has more than 320,000 members. As a non-partisan association, CARP is committed to working with all parties in government to advocate for older Canadians. Its mission is to advocate for better healthcare, financial security, and freedom from ageism. CARP members engage in polls and petitions, email their elected representatives, connect with local chapters and share stories and opinions on urgent issues. Most CARP members also subscribe to ZOOMER Magazine, watch ZoomerTelevision/VisionTV, and listen to Zoomer Radio (AM740/96.7FM/ZoomerRadio.ca). For more information, please visit https://www.carp.ca

 

 

“National Seniors Day is a way for Canada to celebrate seniors for their generous contribution to our families, our communities, our workplaces and our country. Celebrating the day annually will help raise awareness about seniors’ contributions and the important roles they play in Canadian society.”  – Government of Canada

 

Government Resources: https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/corporate/seniors/forum.html

 

 

 

Age Safe® Canada develops training programs and certifications to empower senior services providers to better help decrease falls and fall-related injuries.

 

Advancing Successful Aging at Home™

 

 

When and How to Wash Your Hands

When and How to Wash Your Hands

 

Handwashing is one of the easiest and best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Learn when and how to wash your hands to stay healthy.

 

Wash Your Hands Often to Stay Healthy

You can help yourself and your loved ones stay healthy by washing your hands often, especially during these key times when you are likely to get and spread germs:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage

 

Follow Five Steps to Wash Your Hands the Right Way

Washing your hands is easy, and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of germs. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community—from your home and workplace to childcare facilities and hospitals.

Follow these five steps every time.

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

 

 

Happy Canada Day! 2020

Happy Canada Day! 2020

 

July 1 commemorates the joining of Canada’s original three provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the Canada province, which is now Ontario and Quebec) as one nation in 1867. On July 1, 1867, Canada became a self-governing dominion of Great Britain and a federation of provinces. The anniversary of this date was called Dominion Day (for the Dominion of Canada in the British empire) until 1982. Since 1983, July 1 has been officially known as Canada Day.

 

Since 1958, the government has arranged for an annual celebration of Canada’s Birthday where originally the Canadian Secretary of State was in charge of the Co-ordination of events. The format of trooping of the colours on the lawn at Parliament Hill, a sunset ceremony, and live band with fireworks was the main order of the day. However since 1980 seed money has been distributed by the government of Canada and now popular and amateur activities are organised in hundreds of communities by volunteer groups to mark the day. The sovereign Queen Elizabeth 2nd has attended many times including the Canada Day centennial.

 

Typically, Canada Day is celebrated with fireworks, concerts, cookouts, and sports games. Canada’s capital, Ottawa, Ontario, hosts tens of thousands, and countless events and festivals to be found throughout the city in the city streets, parks, and museums. Fireworks are launched from Parliament Hill to conclude a day of patriotic festivities. Today, amid COVID-19 restrictions, No live fireworks, no star-studded concert on Parliament Hill, and no crowds of tourists: Canada’s official birthday celebrations on this year for the first time ever will be completely online. Although things are different, you can still show off your national pride on this 153rd birthday!

 

Stand Proud. Stay United. Be Safe.

 

 

 

 

 

Bathroom Safety Tips for Elders

Bathroom Safety Tips for Elders

bathroom safety tips

Bathroom Safety Tips

 

Creating a safe home environment for senior citizens starts with the bathroom — the place where, for the elderly, most at-home accidents occur. Whether it’s a slip in the shower or tripping on the way to the restroom at night, falls and injuries are especially common in the bathroom. To improve bathroom safety at home, you need to know how to handle the hazards. Here are some important bathroom safety tips to help keep you or your loved ones safe.

 

  1. 1. INSTALL GRAB BARS Grab bars give you something to hold when you’re getting into and out of the shower. They also offer a way to catch yourself if you’re about to fall. Add grab bars and safety rails to the shower/ tub and near the toilet. Make sure they’re anchored well enough to support an adult’s weight.

 

  1. ADD NON-SKID SURFACES While skid-proof decals are a step in the right direction, they don’t cover the entire bathtub surface, so slips are still possible. Look instead for a mat that covers the surface of the bathtub floor. Likewise, you may want to add a mat with a rubber backing to the bathroom floor.

 

  1. PUT IN NIGHTLIGHTS For those middle-of-the-night trips back and forth to the bathroom, nightlights add illumination that can make all the difference between seeing your way safely to the restroom and tripping on something along the way.

 

  1. LOWER THE WATER TEMPERATURE Set the whole-house water heater temperature to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or lower so that an elderly person is less likely to get burned.

 

  1. PROVIDE SEATING Extended periods of standing to brush teeth, wash up for bed, etc., can be wearying to an elderly body. Add seating to the bathroom so a person can sit while getting ready. Likewise, consider adding a shower chair with a rigid back that allows for a seated position while showering.

 

  1. RAISE THE TOILET SEAT To prevent overexertion from having to go to the bathroom, add a raised toilet seat that makes sitting down and getting up much easier. For anyone with knee pain, hip pain, joint pain, etc., this can be a great, practical way to improve bathroom safety.

 

  1. HAVE ITEMS WITHIN REACH Whether it’s shampoo and conditioner easily reachable in the shower, or toothpaste and soap easy accessible at the sink, keep items in the places where you use them. This helps eliminate unnecessary reaching, searching and standing — and the potential for accidents that comes with them.

 

  1. PROVIDE SUPERVISION In some cases, the best and most important way to protect a senior citizen in the bathroom is through the care of a loved one. Whether it’s a relative, friend or home health aide, having someone nearby greatly reduces the chance of serious injury.

 

Source: www.modernbathroom.com